On the Turntable — The “Best Of the ‘Best Of’” in 2023 jazz recordings

January 8th, 2024

.

.

 

Jonathan Williger of  Pitchfork describes the late trumpeter Jamie Branch’s album Fly or Die Fly or Die Fly or Die ((world war)) as one that “brims with joy and righteous anger, and illuminates the communal ties that underpin both.” 

Of the 12 websites researched for the critics’ choices for best jazz albums of 2023, her album was named on eight of them, more than any other.

 

 

.

.

___

.

 

…..It’s time for our annual compilation of “Best of” jazz recordings, this time for 2023.   As always, there are a large number of “Best of” lists to be found on the Internet, and the goal of this post is to present those jazz albums oft-mentioned by a wide range of critics.

…..While these 10 albums hardly constitute a comprehensive assessment of the “Best Of the ‘Best Of’” lists, it does provide some guidance about 2023 recordings critics seemed to agree about, and suggest we check out more thoroughly.

…..The recordings are listed in the order of those receiving the most critic mentions as compiled from 12 websites, and may include a link to an artist or record company website, as well as to a critic’s more complete review of the album. Readers will also discover that a song from each album is available for listening. The websites utilized to compile this list are found at the conclusion of this post.

…..As always, the lists feature an eclectic mix of listening experiences, and  once again prove that jazz music is in good hands…Enjoy!

.

Joe Maita

Editor/Publisher

.

 

.

.

_______

.

.

Jamie Branch

Fly or Die Fly or Die Fly or Die ((world war))/ [International Anthem]

.

“Jaimie Branch had nearly finished mixing this album — the third studio record from her trumpet-cello-bass-drums quartet, Fly or Die — when she  died suddenly in 2022. It would be hard to imagine a more rousing and generous parting gift. Branch was a declarative trumpeter who had only recently embraced her unrefined-but-rewarding singing voice. With it she entreats us to love, to agitate and to put ourselves on the line.”

-Giovanni Russenello/New York Times

.

“Midway through ‘burning grey,’ from her riotous third and final album Fly or Die Fly or Die Fly or Die ((world war)), jaimie branch issues an exhortation that could serve as her artistic mission statement: ‘Don’t forget to fight.’  Whether leading her Fly or Die quartet or working as a prolific collaborator across scenes and cities, the trumpeter, composer, and vocalist, who died of undisclosed causes at 39 last year, made music from a position of joyful defiance.”

-Andy Cush/Pitchfork

.

.

“burning grey”

[Redeye Worldwide]

.

.

_______

.

.

 

Cecile McLorin Salvant

Mélusine/ [Nonesuch]

.

“This album is as much cabaret, Renaissance, mystical, and folk as it is jazz, but it features Cécile McLorin Salvant, the greatest jazz singer (one of the greatest singers, period) of our time, so it would top the list of any musical genre (or come close). Inspired by a 14th-century French fairy tale, with songs spanning from the 12th century to vaudeville ditties and Broadway showtunes to a few Salvant originals, it’s adventurous, witty, alternately joyful, tragic, and melancholy, sometimes lush (her pure voice backed by her standard jazz quartet), sometimes lean (just her and a djembe percussionist or a nylon-stringed guitar), and in all cases gorgeous. She sings this almost entirely in French; in other words, she’s so unrivaled in her art, she can get away with anything she wants, and enchantingly so.”

-Fred Kaplan/Slate

.

“Anyone who thinks they already know the full extent of Cécile McLorin Salvant’s artistry should listen to  Mélusine  without further delay. Bringing together five new Salvant originals with the most eclectic array of covers we’ve yet heard from the three-time Grammy Award winner, it’s a remarkable recording…

-Peter Quinn/Jazzwise

.

“La route enchantee”

[Nonesuch]

 

.

.

_______

.

.

 

 

Matana Roberts

Coin Coin Chapter Five: In the Garden/ [Constellation]

.

“Roberts’s ambitious, multi-part project continues with this deeply personal album. Weaving field recordings, spoken word, and improvisational jazz with themes of nature and healing, it’s a sonic tapestry that speaks to liberation coming out of a traumatic family episode. This album is a reminder that jazz can be a vehicle for personal and environmental healing, offering solace and prompting reflection.”

 

Hi Fi Trends

.

“Coin Coin Chapter Five: In the Garden’s  collision of styles, genres, and individual and group voices are not only welcome, but essential to the process of Roberts engendering dialogue, celebrating difference, and communicating emotions, psychologies, and cultures, all testifying to the import and cultural and artistic achievement of her evolving project.”

-Thom Jurek/All Music

.

“unbeknownst”

[BWSCD].

.

.

_______

.

.

 

James Brandon Lewis/Red Lily Quartet

For Mahalia, With Love/ [Tao Forms]

.

“James Brandon Lewis is on quite a run, and his terrific Red Lily Quintet (Kirk Knuffke’s cornet, Christopher Hoffman on cello, bassist William Parker, and drummer Chad Taylor) is an ideal group for taking simple songs and spinning them into gold. The songs here are all gospel classics associated with or inspired by the legendary singer Mahalia Jackson — material like “Swing Low” and “Wade in the Water”. Lewis and his band are in the tradition and modern at the same time, constantly reinventing the forms and feelings of these powerful melodies.”

-Will Layman/Pop Matters

.

“On  For Mahalia, With Love,  saxophonist James Brandon Lewis and his Red Lily Quintet reworked the music of gospel legend  Mahalia Jackson, imbuing it with all the heart of the originals but with a force of will all their own. Back in September, I said this was the sound of raw magic at work. Months later, and that magic still rings with a potency to move mountains, elicit starstruck wonderment.

-Dave Sumner/Bandcamp

.

.

“Wade in the Water”

[Virtual Label LLC]

.

.

 

_______

.

.

 

Darcy James Argue’s Secret Society

Dynamic Maximum Tension [Nonesuch]

.

“Darcy James Argue, a composer devoted to jazz’s tradition of large-ensemble orchestration, moved to Brooklyn 20 years ago, after earning his masters at the New England Conservatory. His mentor there,  Bob Brookmeyer, is one of the heroes invoked on  Dynamic Maximum Tension,  Argue’s fourth and most ambitious release; among the others are jazz forebear  Duke Ellington, architectural futurist Buckminster Fuller, cryptographer Alan Turing and Hollywood trailblazer Mae West. These figures haunt the complex machinery and political agency of Argue’s music, daringly executed by the  Secret Society, his 18-piece band.

-Nate Chinen/NPR

.

“It may be a stretch to say this Vancouver-bred composer and band leader has singlehandedly reinvented big-band music. But not by much, as this dazzling, unfailingly creative album — which last month earned a Grammy Award nomination — vividly attests.”

-George Varga/San Diego Union-Tribune

.

“Dymaxion”.

[Nonesuch]

.

.

_______

.

.

 

 

Tyshawn Sorey

Continuing/[Pi Recordings]

.

“When the pandemic drove the MacArthur award-winning African American drummer and composer/improviser Tyshawn Sorey online, he unveiled an astonishing diversity of new works – including violin and cello concertos, string quartets, live-streamed improvisations with chamber orchestra Alarm Will Sound. He also recorded a genre-hopping run of albums, of which this latest set by his trio with pianist Aaron Diehl and bassist Matt Brewer – covering original jazz themes by Wayne Shorter, Ahmad Jamal and others – is a startling standout.

– John Fordham/The Guardian

.

“There’s a delicious tension in Sorey’s trio, a sensation of explosive energies pulsing beneath every placid surface. When I caught the band at the Village Vanguard one evening this fall, that push-pull often found Diehl teetering on the far threshold of control (a thrilling thing to hear, from a musician of such exceptional poise). That live experience surely informed my love of  Continuing;  so too does the prescient inclusion of songs by Wayne Shorter and Ahmad Jamal, two masters we lost this year. Pianist  Harold Mabern, who died in 2019, also has a tune in the track list. Sorey pays these masters an homage that feels palpably sincere.

-Nate Chinen/NPR

.

Click here to hear music from  Continuum 

.

.

_______

.

.

 

 

Kris Davis

Diatom Ribbons Live at the Village Vanguard/[Pyroclastic Records]

.

“This live version of  Kris Davis‘  Diatom Ribbons  album features drummer Terri Lyne Carrington, guitarists Nels Cline and Marc Ribot, bassist Trevor Dunn, and Val Jeanty on turntables, among others. But unlike that killer album from 2019 (my favorite of that year), the live set covers a wider set of music. Davis works with spoken word recordings of her heroes — “VW” features a herky-jerky theme around the words of Sun Ra, and “Bird Call Blues” finds Jeanty layering various sampled and turntable sounds with birdlike percussion including the voice of pianist Paul Bley talking about the genius of Charlie Parker — but “Alice in the Congo” by Ronald Shannon Jackson is more of a cooker and Geri Allen’s “The Dancer” uses pointillistic subtlety and a loping groove to seduce. There are tone poems, ballads, Latin percussion, and even two versions of Wayne Shorter’s “Dolores” that let the leader and Lage cut loose on the past as well as the moment.

-Will Layman/Pop Matters

.

“This double album isn’t just a live recording; it’s a masterclass in the magic of improvisation. Davis’s award-winning project takes on new life through the energy of this legendary venue. Joined by Terri Lyne Carrington and Val Jeanty, their sonic dialogue flows with organic grace, reminding us that jazz is a living, breathing conversation, a continuous dance between players and the audience.”

Hi-Fi Trends

.

“Bird Call Blues”.

[The Orchard]

.

.

_______

.

.

 

 

Brad Mehldau

Your Mother Should Know/[Nonesuch]

.

“This may be the only jazz album of Beatles songs that works, in part because Mehldau—a pianist of pristine touch, dexterous rhythm, and a peerlessly colorful harmonic sense who was born in 1970, the year the Beatles broke up—chose lesser-known tunes with odd rhythms or intriguing harmonies (mainly from  Revolver,  Abbey Road,  and  Magical Mystery Tour)  and embellished those elements. It’s for the most part a delight and a triumph.”

-Fred Kaplan/Slate

.

“Mehldau’s highly expressive touch and use of rubato and dynamics are nothing less than exemplary and unexpected twists add a new dimension to the material without abstracting the original songs. It’s a recipe that’s likely to satisfy both jazz lovers and fussily dedicated Beatles fans alike.” 

Selwyn Harris/Jazzwise

 

.

“Your Mother Should Know”

[Nonesuch]

.

.

_______

.

.

 

Fred Hersch & Esperanza Spalding

Alive at the Village Vanguard/[Palmetto Records]

.

“Two masters, one magical evening — Hersch at piano, Spalding with just her lovely voice.”

Downbeat

.

“Much more than simply a lively jazz standards album, Alive at the Village Vanguard captures these two jazz kindred spirits in joyous, creative play.

-Matt Collar/All Music

.

“Girl Talk”

[The Orchard]

[Non.

.

.

_______

.

.

 

Yussef Dayes

Black Classical Music/[Nonesuch]

.

“A longtime staple of the UK jazz scene, drummer and composer Yussef Dayes released one of the most widely-loved jazz albums of the past decade as one half of Yussef Kamaal (with Kamaal Williams) on 2016’s  Black Focus,  and–following a 2020 album with Tim Misch, a live trio album that same year, and more – he finally released his first proper album as a bandleader with 2023’s Black Classical Music.  It’s one of the most gorgeous, sprawling albums of the year in any genre, with lush, organic instrumentals and forays into electronic music, funk, reggae, R&B, and more. Fleshed out with contributions from Shabaka Hutchings, Chronixx, Masego, Jamilah Barry, Rocco Palladino, the aforementioned Tom Misch, and a handful of others, the 19-song, 74-minute album is a total journey. It’s rooted in both the past and the future. It connects the dots between an array of musical inventions of the African diaspora. Black Classical Music  is the perfect title.

-Andrew Sacher/Brooklyn Vegan

.

 

“…By the time he sat down to record  Black Classical Music,  Dayes most likely had a clear idea of what he could do and where he wanted to go. And boy, does he go places. Armed with 19 tracks and using almost every square inch available on a compact disc, Black Classical Music  takes the listener on a highly groovy and ultimately fulfilling ride through the peaks and valleys inside of Dayes’ musical brain. To say that every stone is overturned would be overselling it. Dayes doesn’t achieve everything, but there are still an impressive number of stones flipped over in the creation of this album.”

 -Will Layman/Pop Matters

.

“Black Classical Music” (official video).

.

.

_______

.

.

 

The lists and reviews utilized for this feature can be accessed by clicking on the links below:

.

 

All Music

Bandcamp

Brooklyn Vegan

Downbeat

Guardian

Hi-Fi Trends

Jazzwise

NPR

New York Times

Pop Matters

San Diego Union-Tribune

Slate

.

.

_____

.

.

 

 

Click here to read “The Best of ‘The Best of’ in 2022 Jazz Recordings”

Click here to read “The Best of ‘The Best of’ in 2021 Jazz Recordings”

Click here to read “The Best of ‘The Best of’ in 2020 Jazz Recordings”

.

.

 

___

.

.

Click here to read The Sunday Poem

Click here to read “A Collection of Jazz Poetry – Summer, 2023 Edition”

Click here for information about how to submit your poetry or short fiction

Click here to subscribe to the (free) Jerry Jazz Musician quarterly newsletter

Click here to help support the ongoing publication of Jerry Jazz Musician, and to keep it ad and commercial-free (thank you!)

.

___

.

.

Jerry Jazz Musician…human produced (and AI-free) since 1999

.

.

.

Share this:

Comment on this article:

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

In This Issue

"Nina" by Marsha Hammel
A Collection of Jazz Poetry — Winter, 2024 Edition...One-third of the Winter, 2024 collection of jazz poetry is made up of poets who have only come to my attention since the publication of the Summer, 2023 collection. What this says about jazz music and jazz poetry – and this community – is that the connection between the two art forms is inspirational and enduring, and that poets are finding a place for their voice within the pages of this website. (Featuring the art of Marsha Hammel)

The Sunday Poem

"Zambramomania" by Roberto Nucci/CC BY-NC-SA-4.0 DEED
“The Eye Tapes…Monument to my Jazzy Eye” by Anita Lerek

Poetry

Proceeding From Behind: A collection of poems grounded in the rhythmic, relating to the remarkable, by Terrance Underwood...A relaxed, familiar comfort emerges from the poet Terrance Underwood’s language of intellectual acuity, wit, and space – a feeling similar to one gets while listening to Monk, or Jamal, or Miles. I have long wanted to share his gifts as a poet on an expanded platform, and this 33-poem collection – woven among his audio readings, music he considers significant to his story, and brief personal comments – fulfills my desire to do so.

Black History

The Harlem Globetrotters/photo via Wikimedia Commons
A Black History Month Profile: The Harlem Globetrotters...In this 2005 interview, Ben Green, author of Spinning the Globe: The Rise, Fall, and Return to Greatness of the Harlem Globetrotters, discusses the complex history of the celebrated Black touring basketball team.

Black History

photo of Zora Neale Hurston by Carl Van Vechten/Library of Congress
A Black History Month Profile: Zora Neale Hurston...In a 2002 interview, Carla Kaplan, editor of Zora Neale Hurston: A Life in Letters, talks about the novelist, anthropologist, playwright, folklorist, essayist and poet

Black History

Eubie Blake
A Black History Month Profile – Pianist and composer Eubie Blake...In this 2021 Jerry Jazz Musician interview, Eubie Blake biographers Ken Bloom and Richard Carlin discuss the legendary composer of American popular song and jazz during the 20th century

Feature

Jamie Branch's 2023 album "Fly or Die Fly or Die Fly or Die ((world war))"
On the Turntable— The “Best Of the ‘Best Of’” in 2023 jazz recordings...A year-end compilation of jazz albums oft mentioned by a wide range of critics as being the best of 2023 - including the late trumpeter Jamie Branch's Fly or Die Fly or Die Fly or Die ((world war))

Essay

"Lester Leaps In" by Tad Richards
"Jazz and American Poetry," an essay by Tad Richards...In an essay that first appeared in the Greenwood Encyclopedia of American Poetry in 2005, Tad Richards - a prolific visual artist, poet, novelist, and nonfiction writer who has been active for over four decades – writes about the history of the connection of jazz and American poetry.

Interview

photo of Pepper Adams/courtesy of Pepper Adams Estate
Interview with Gary Carner, author of Pepper Adams: Saxophone Trailblazer...The author speaks with Bob Hecht about his book and his decades-long dedication to the genius of Pepper Adams, the stellar baritone saxophonist whose hard-swinging bebop style inspired many of the top-tier modern baritone players.

Poetry

art by Russell duPont
These poems are new submissions by six poets relatively new to Jerry Jazz Musician, and are an example of the writing I have the privilege of encountering on a regular basis.

Interview

IISG, CC BY-SA 2.0 , via Wikimedia Commons
Interview with Judith Tick, author of Becoming Ella Fitzgerald: The Jazz Singer Who Transformed American Song...The author discusses her book, a rich, emotionally stirring, exceptional work that explores every element of Ella’s legacy in great depth, reminding readers that she was not only a great singing artist, but also a musical visionary and social activist.

Poetry

Trading Fours with Douglas Cole is an occasional series of the writer’s poetic interpretations of jazz recordings and film. This edition is influenced by Stillpoint, the 2021 album by Zen practitioner Barrett Martin

Playlist

“Latin Tinges in Modern Jazz” – a playlist by Bob Hecht...A nine-hour long Spotify playlist featuring songs by the likes of Horace Silver, Lee Morgan, Miles Davis, Wayne Shorter, Ahmad Jamal, and Dizzy Gillespie that demonstrates how the Latin music influence on jazz has been present since the music’s beginnings.

Poetry

[Columbia Legacy]
“On Becoming A Jazz Fanatic In The Early 1970’s” – 20 linked short poems by Daniel Brown

Short Fiction

Christerajet, CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons
Short Fiction Contest-winning story #64 — “The Old Casino” by J.B. Marlow...The author's award-winning story takes place over the course of a young man's life, looking at all the women he's loved and how the presence of a derelict building informs those relationships.

Feature

George Shearing/Associated Booking Corporation/James Kriegsmann, New York, via Wikimedia Commons
True Jazz Stories: “An Evening With George,” by Terry Sanville...The writer tells his story of playing guitar with a symphony orchestra, backing up jazz legend George Shearing.

Short Fiction

Defense Visual Information Distribution Service/via Picryl.com
“Afloat” – a finalist in the 64th Jerry Jazz Musician Short Fiction Contest – is about a troubled man in his 40s who lessens his worries by envisioning himself and loved ones on a boat that provides safety and ease for all of them.

Poetry

The poet Connie Johnson in 1981
In a Place of Dreams: Connie Johnson’s album of jazz poetry, music, and life stories...A collection of the remarkable poet's work is woven among her audio readings, a personal narrative of her journey and music she considers significant to it, providing readers the chance to experience the full value of her gifts.

Book Excerpt

Book Excerpt from Becoming Ella Fitzgerald: The Jazz Singer Who Transformed American Song, by Judith Tick...The author writes about highlights of Ella’s career, and how the significance of her Song Book recordings is an example of her “becoming” Ella.

Community

Nominations for the Pushcart Prize XLVIII

Interview

photo courtesy of Henry Threadgill
Interview with Brent Hayes Edwards, co-author (with Henry Threadgill) of Easily Slip Into Another World: A Life in Music...The author discusses his work co-written with Threadgill, the composer and multi-instrumentalist widely recognized as one of the most original and innovative voices in contemporary music, and the winner of the 2016 Pulitzer Prize for Music.

Playlist

photo by William Gottlieb/Library of Congress
“A Baker’s Dozen Playlist of Ella Fitzgerald Specialties from Five Decades,” as selected by Ella biographer Judith Tick...Chosen from Ella’s entire repertoire, Ms. Tick’s intriguing playlist (with brief commentary) is a mix of studio recordings, live dates, and video, all available for listening here.

Poetry

"Jazz Trio" by Samuel Dixon
A collection of jazz haiku, Vol. 2...The 19 poets included in this collection effectively share their reverence for jazz music and its culture with passion and brevity.

Jazz History Quiz #169

This trumpeter was in the 1932 car accident that took the life of famed clarinetist/saxophonist Frankie Techemacher (pictured), and is best remembered for his work with Eddie Condon’s bands. Who was he?

Interview

From the Interview Archive: A 2011 conversation with Alyn Shipton, author of Hi-De-Ho: The Life of Cab Calloway...In this interview, Shipton discusses Cab Calloway, whose vocal theatrics and flamboyant stage presence made him one of the country’s most beloved entertainers.

Community

Nominations for the Pushcart Prize XLVIII...announcing the six Jerry Jazz Musician-published writers nominated for the prestigious literary award

Poetry

Gotfryd, Bernard, photographer, Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons
“Devotion” – a poem and 11 “Musings on Monk,” by Connie Johnson

Photography

photo of Mal Waldron by Giovanni Piesco
Beginning in 1990, the noted photographer Giovanni Piesco began taking backstage photographs of many of the great musicians who played in Amsterdam’s Bimhuis, that city’s main jazz venue which is considered one of the finest in the world. Jerry Jazz Musician will occasionally publish portraits of jazz musicians that Giovanni has taken over the years. This edition is of the pianist/composer Mal Waldron, taken on three separate appearances at Bimhuis (1996, 2000 and 2001).

Interview

Leffler, Warren K/Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons
A Black History Month Profile: Civil Rights Leader Bayard Rustin...

Community

FOTO:FORTEPAN / Kölcsey Ferenc Dunakeszi Városi Könyvtár / Petanovics fényképek, CC BY-SA 3.0 , via Wikimedia Commons
.“Community Bookshelf, #1"...a twice-yearly space where writers who have been published on Jerry Jazz Musician can share news about their recently authored books. This edition includes information about books published within the last six months or so…

Short Fiction

photo by Thomas Leuthard/Wikimedia Commons
“The Winslows Take New Orleans” a short story by Mary Liza Hartong...This story, a finalist in the recently concluded 64th Jerry Jazz Musician Short Fiction Contest, tells the tale of Uncle Cheapskate and Aunt Whiner, those pesky relatives you love to hate and hate to love.

Short Fiction

painting of Gaetano Donizetti by Francesco Coghetti/via Wikimedia Commons
“A Single Furtive Tear” – a short story by Dora Emma Esze...A short-listed entry in the recently concluded 64th Jerry Jazz Musician Short Fiction Contest, the story is a heartfelt, grateful monologue to one Italian composer, dead and immortal of course, whose oeuvre means so much to so many of us.

Interview

photo by William Gottlieb/Library of Congress
Interview with Alyn Shipton, author of The Gerry Mulligan 1950’s Quartets...Long regarded as jazz music’s most eminent baritone saxophonist, Gerry Mulligan was a central figure in “cool” jazz whose contributions to it also included his important work as a composer and arranger. Noted jazz scholar Alyn Shipton, author of The Gerry Mulligan 1950s Quartets, and Jerry Jazz Musician contributing writer Bob Hecht discuss Mulligan’s unique contributions to modern jazz.

Book Excerpt

“Chick” Webb was one of the first virtuoso drummers in jazz and an innovative bandleader dubbed the “Savoy King,” who reigned at Harlem’s world-famous Savoy Ballroom. Stephanie Stein Crease is the first to fully tell Webb’s story in her biography, Rhythm Man: Chick Webb and the Beat that Changed America…The book’s entire introduction is excerpted here.

Short Fiction

pixabay.com via Picryl.com
“The Silent Type,” a short story by Tom Funk...The story, a finalist in the recently concluded 64th Short Fiction Contest, is inspired by the classic Bob Dylan song “Tangled Up in Blue” which speculates about what might have been the back story to the song.

Book Excerpt

Book excerpt from Easily Slip Into Another World: A Life in Music, by Henry Threadgill and Brent Hayes Edwards

Contributing Writers

Click the image to view the writers, poets and artists whose work has been published on Jerry Jazz Musician, and find links to their work

Art

Designed for Dancing: How Midcentury Records Taught America to Dance: “Outtakes” — Vol. 2...In this edition, the authors Janet Borgerson and Jonathan Schroeder share examples of Cha Cha Cha record album covers that didn't make the final cut in their book

Pressed for All Time

“Pressed For All Time,” Vol. 17 — producer Joel Dorn on Rahsaan Roland Kirk’s 1967 album, The Inflated Tear

Coming Soon

An interview with Tad Richards, author of Jazz With a Beat: Small Group Swing, 1940 - 1960;  an interview with Laura Flam and Emily Sieu Liebowitz, authors of But Will You Love Me Tomorrow? An Oral History of the 60's Girl Groups;  a new collection of jazz poetry; a collection of jazz haiku; a new Jazz History Quiz; short fiction; poetry; photography; interviews; playlists; and lots more in the works...

Interview Archive

Eubie Blake
Click to view the complete 22 year archive of Jerry Jazz Musician interviews, including those recently published with Richard Carlin and Ken Bloom on Eubie Blake (pictured); Richard Brent Turner on jazz and Islam; Alyn Shipton on the art of jazz; Shawn Levy on the original queens of standup comedy; Travis Atria on the expatriate trumpeter Arthur Briggs; Kitt Shapiro on her life with her mother, Eartha Kitt; Will Friedwald on Nat King Cole; Wayne Enstice on the drummer Dottie Dodgion; the drummer Joe La Barbera on Bill Evans; Philip Clark on Dave Brubeck; Nicholas Buccola on James Baldwin and William F. Buckley; Ricky Riccardi on Louis Armstrong; Dan Morgenstern and Christian Sands on Erroll Garner; Maria Golia on Ornette Coleman.

Site Archive