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  • Jazz History, Culture, Community
  • Jazz History, Culture, Community

In This Issue

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One-third of the Winter, 2024 collection of jazz poetry is made up of poets who have only come to my attention since the publication of the Summer, 2023 collection. What this says about jazz music and jazz poetry – and this community – is that the connection between the two art forms is inspirational and enduring, and that poets are finding a place for their voice within the pages of this website.

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Click here  to read the collection.

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(Featuring the art of Marsha Hammel)

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Also in this Issue

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An interview with Laura Flam and Emily Sieu Liebowitz, authors of But Will You Love Me Tomorrow?: An Oral History of the 60’s Girl Groups

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An interview with Tad Richards, author of Jazz With a Beat: Small Group Swing, 1940 – 1960

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An interview with Judith Tick, author of Becoming Ella Fitzgerald: The Jazz Singer Who Transformed American Song

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An interview with Gary Carner, author of Pepper Adams: Saxophone Trailblazer

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IN THIS ISSUE

photo by Rhonda Dorsett

On turning 70, and contemplating the future of Jerry Jazz Musician

Thoughts on embracing a new stage in life, and where I hope to go next with Jerry Jazz Musician

The Marvelettes/via Wikimedia Commons

Interview with Laura Flam and Emily Sieu Liebowitz, authors of But Will You Love Me Tomorrow?: An Oral History of the 60’s Girl Groups

Little is known of the lives and challenges many of the young Black women who made up the Girl Groups of the ‘60’s faced while performing during an era rife with racism, sexism, and music industry corruption.  The authors discuss their book’s mission to provide the artists an opportunity to voice their experiences so crucial to the evolution of popular music.

Proceeding From Behind: A collection of poems grounded in the rhythmic, relating to the remarkable, by Terrance Underwood

A relaxed, familiar comfort emerges from the poet Terrance Underwood’s language of intellectual acuity, wit, and space – a feeling similar to one gets while listening to Monk, or Jamal, or Miles. I have long wanted to share his gifts as a poet on an expanded platform, and this 33-poem collection – woven among his audio readings, music he considers significant to his story, and brief personal comments – fulfills my desire to do so.

photo of Louis Jordan by William Gottlieb/Library of Congress

Interview with Tad Richards, author of Jazz With a Beat: Small Group Swing, 1940 – 1960

Richards makes the case that small group swing players like Illinois Jacquet, Louis Jordan (pictured) and Big Jay McNeely played a legitimate jazz that was a more pleasing listening experience to the Black community than the bebop of Parker, Dizzy, and Monk. It is a fascinating era, filled with major figures and events, and centered on a rigorous debate that continues to this day – is small group swing “real jazz?”

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