• This month’s edition looks at album covers showing teenagers enjoying their music!

  • Musicians and journalists share their lists of favorite jazz albums recorded during the 1960′s with our readers

  • Disenchanted leaves fell early through the trees the summer I left my life for an ashram. The path to the ashram snaked into the woods not far from Tanglewood and reminded me less of where I had been than where I was going

  • A photo gallery of select Van Vechten portraits

     

     

  • Cover Stories with Paul Morris, Volume 6
  • What are 3 or 4 of your favorite jazz albums from the 1960's?
  • "Epistrophy," a short story by Arya Jenkins
  • The Photography of Carl Van Vechten
bluenote1 Features » Press Releases

Blue Note’s “Vinyl Initiative” and other news

As part of its 75th Anniversary celebration, Blue Note records has announced that it has “donned our lab coats” and worked with “a team of dedicated and groovy engineers” in an all-out effort to release 100 “essential remastered jazz albums” on vinyl, beginning with the March 25 release of Art Blakey Free For All, John Coltrane Blue Train, Eric Dolphy Out To Lunch, Wayne Shorter Speak No Evil, and Larry Young Unity. Future vinyl releases are expected on a monthly basis, and will feature “modern classics” as well, including Joe Lovano Quartet: Live At The Village Vanguard, Jason Moran Soundtrack To Human Motion, Terence Blanchard Flow, Medeski Martin & Wood Combustication, and Cassandra Wilson Traveling Miles.

The vinyl release is just part of the news reported in their February 28 press release. “On the same date,” the release states, “the GRAMMY Museum in Los Angeles will launch Blue Note Records: The Finest In Jazz, a one-of-a-kind exhibit offering visitors an in-depth look at the legendary record label through music, album artwork, photographs, artifacts, […] Continue reading »

parkermarch3a Quiz Show

Monday Jazz Quiz #28

What sax player initially turned from the alto to the tenor sax in a purported effort to escape his image as a follower of Charlie Parker?

_____

Dexter Gordon

Cannonball Adderley

Nat Adderley

Sonny Stitt

Sonny Rollins

Gene Ammons

Roland Kirk

[…] Continue reading »

monkhall Features

Liner Notes — The Thelonious Monk Orchestra at Town Hall, by Orrin Keepnews

Growing up in the San Francisco Bay area in the 1960′s and early 1970′s afforded me access to incredible, cutting-edge radio. It was the height of the progressive FM radio era, and no station in the country understood its market opportunity better than KSAN, rock radio legend Tom Donohue’s creation that gave a musical platform to breaking local and national acts who remain the backbone of the “classic rock” radio format.

international acts who remain the backbone of the “classic rock” radio format.

While the bulk of the programming exposed rock and roll recordings introduced by the local hip DJ (the voice of Bob McClay referring to KSAN as the “Jive 95″ lives on in my unconscious), for a year or two I looked forward with great enthusiasm to the Sunday evening jazz show hosted by Orrin Keepnews, the co-founder of New York’s Riverside Records — by then long in bankruptcy but whose recordings were already a staple of recorded jazz history. His shows weren’t solely responsible for introducing me to the artists on his labels (including Milestone at the time — an offshoot of Berkeley’s Fantasy Records, where Keepnews was head of A & R), but they were a culprit for perpetuating my curiosity of them.
[…] Continue reading »

monkmarshall Art

Masters of Jazz Photography — Jim Marshall

The great improvisational American jazz musicians of the mid-20th century inspired a generation of photographers to develop a looser, moodier style of visual expression. That evocative approach is on striking display in The Jazz Image: Masters of Jazz Photography. Covering six decades of performers — from Louis Armstrong and Duke Ellington to John Coltrane and Miles Davis — this unique collection is as much a comprehensive catalogue of jazz greats as it is a salute to the photographers who captured them.

Jerry Jazz Musician presents a number of editions of “Master of Jazz Photography,” featuring a work by one of the photographers featured in The Jazz Image

This edition: Jim Marshall

[…] Continue reading »

etude1 Features

Revisiting “The Jazz Problem”

In 1924, jazz was becoming popular in the major cities of New Orleans, Chicago, Kansas City and New York, and with Paul Whiteman’s Aeolian Hall performance of George Gershwin’s Rhapsody in Blue, it was being judged in some critical circles as a serious musical art form. That wasn’t the opinion of everyone, of course.

“‘Jazz’ has created a ‘malarious’ atmosphere in the musical world. It is abnormal. The air needs clarifying.” So wrote popular music composer Robert M. Stults in the August 1924 edition of The Etude magazine, an issue dedicated to what they defined as “The Jazz Problem.”

The Etude was published from 1883 – 1957 and was a popular music publication of the era. Its primary audience was made up of popular music teachers, and the debate of the time of this particular edition was the legitimacy of this controversial new music known as “Jazz.” To solicit opinion about jazz, The Etude posed the question “Where is Jazz Leading America?” to composers, educators, musicians, members of the clergy, playwrights and novelists.

The debate inspired by this question featured fascinating perspectives, […] Continue reading »