• “The Blues Museum,” by Jay Franzel

  • This edition tells the story of Billy Taylor’s 1937 visit to Jelly Roll Morton’s Washington, D.C. club, where he witnessed Morton’s “arrogant wisdom”

  • She was born into a family of musicians. Her father had played bass in a jazz band and traveled with Dizzy until an accident had cost him his arm and his career. Getting out of a limousine that had stalled on the highway en route to a gig in Chicago, he opened the car door to

  • Paul shares some of his personal jazz record collection, concentrating on the lesser known and sometimes quirky covers

  • Short Fiction Contest Winning Story
  • Great Encounters: When Billy Taylor saw Jelly Roll Morton
  • "Woman Plays Horn" - a short story by Arya Jenkins
  • Cover Stories with Paul Morris, Vol. 14
monk1 Art » Masters of Jazz Photography

Masters of Jazz Photography — Ray Avery

In honor of the late jazz photographer Lee Tanner, Jerry Jazz Musician presents a number of editions of “Master of Jazz Photography,” featuring a work by one of the photographers featured in Tanner’s book The Jazz Image.

This edition: Ray Avery […] Continue reading »

butler1 Uncategorized

Learning to love jazz again

From a recent edition of Slate comes a lovely blog post from Isaac Butler, who rediscovered his passion for jazz after challenging himself to find the fragment of music originally responsible for his interest in jazz. It is a brief, satisfying read…




More than two years ago, as summer changed to fall, I was walking to the gym when I heard, wafting out of the window of a restaurant, a snatch of a jazz song. It was a minor third, descending to the root, first on a trumpet, then on a

[…] Continue reading »

bluesmuseum3 Literature

Short Fiction Contest-winning story #40 — “The Blues Museum,” by Jay Franzel

Camp looked through glass doors and across the shoulderless highway. A patch of grass across the road was covered with white trailers washed clean by the rain. He stared out a side window at the brown back of a gas station. A red and yellow sign, mounted so high he had to twist his neck to see it, seemed like it should have been turning but sat still against a gray sky.

What do you find in a bus station? Long waits under dirty fluorescents, grimy floor and seats, gloom on scattered faces. Soup, coffee and candy vending machines. If someone could gather it up, all the pieces a bus station’s handed down through the years, you could start a museum. You could cover the walls with […] Continue reading »

miles-tanner1 Literature » Poetry

New poetry from Roger Singer


Sing me up. Bring the jazz
for the baptizing of souls,
living strong, breathing cool
fires from river running out of
the Ohio snaking down mightily
to Louisiana where the steps
get wide and songs speak
of folks left behind, walking
river banks, looking south,
[…] Continue reading »

kenton3 Quiz Show » Jazz History Quiz

Jazz History Quiz #77

Prior to his time with Stan Kenton’s Innovations Orchestra , this trumpeter — who some have said could play higher than any other trumpeter up to that point in history — gained experience with the big bands of Boyd Raeburn, Jimmy Dorsey and Charlie Barnet. Who is he?

Bill Coleman

Maynard Ferguson

Shorty Baker

Ruby Braff

Conte Candoli

Conrad Gozzo

Jack Sheldon

Go to the next page for the answer!

[…] Continue reading »