• LeRoi Jones’ (Amiri Baraka) poetic, politically exuberant album liner notes to the 1965 album, New Wave in Jazz

  • On the recording Frank Sinatra Conducts Tone Poems of Color

  • She stood in a room at The Met glancing at the painting on the wall, which was of two women kissing. From her vantage point, standing slightly away and to the side, the two women lying together interlocked in bed appeared cushioned awkwardly in space, free-floating yet connected.

  • In this edition, Paul looks at the art of London Records

  • Liner Notes: The New Wave in Jazz, by LeRoi Jones
  • A Moment in Time — Capitol Records’ Studio A, 1956
  • "The Blue Kiss" -- a short story by Arya Jenkins
  • Cover Stories with Paul Morris, Vol. 15
jackt1 Quiz Show » Jazz History Quiz

Jazz History Quiz #82

Prior to Jack Teagarden, this trombonist — who gained a strong reputation playing with the Original Memphis Five and Red Nichols — was the most advanced in jazz. He eventually went on to play with Paul Whiteman, Benny Goodman and Eddie Condon, with “Peg of My Heart” his most popular recording. Who was he?

 

J.C. Higginbotham

Tricky Sam Nanton

Miff Mole

Kid Ory

Lawrence Brown

Juan Tizol

Trummy Young

Go to the next page for the answer!

 

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white1 Features » In Memoriam

A brief tribute to Maurice White

On the heels of the deaths of iconic rock musicians David Bowie and Glenn Frey comes the very sad news that Maurice White, the founder of the Earth, Wind and Fire, has died today at age 74. White’s music came to prominence in the thick of soul’s musical ascent, and E W & F embodied the sound of urban America at the time, their message communicated optimistically and on a large scale. White’s band possessed an unusual crossover appeal — the fact that his death has invited praise from

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debrahurd1 Literature » Poetry

Poetry by Mike Faran

INSIDE THE LANDSCAPE LOUNGE

We drank bourbon & listened to
Hank Gathercole on sax
cutting a throat
through heavy pink clouds of
cigarette smoke

Man was he cuttin’ it!
& all the while his feet were sliding

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thekiss1 Literature » Jazz Fiction by Arya Jenkins

“THE BLUE KISS” — a short story by Arya Jenkins

She stood in a room at The Met glancing at the painting on the wall, which was of two women kissing. From her vantage point, standing slightly away and to the side, the two women lying together interlocked in bed appeared cushioned awkwardly in space, free-floating yet connected.

The painting was by Henri Toulouse-Lautrec, the alcoholic French dwarf artist, and she tried to imagine what it was like living when he did in Paris at the time of the painting, 1892, and what it might have been like for these two prostitutes and others like them who often turned to one another for relief from a world of men then.

Mireille, it was reported, was one of the girls in the brothel in the Rue d’Amboise, when Lautrec was commissioned to create a series of panels about the lives of the girls there, and she was one of his favorites. He visited the salons of the brothels in the Rue des Moulins and Rue d’Amboise many times to study and paint the women, who felt very free to be

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newwave1 Features » Liner Notes

Liner Notes: The New Wave in Jazz, by LeRoi Jones and Steve Young

On March 28, 1965, a concert benefiting the Black Arts Repertory Theatre/School was held at New York’s Village Gate. Featuring John Coltrane, Archie Shepp, Sun Ra (he played but his music didn’t make the album) and Albert Ayler – artists described by Black Arts Music Coordinator Steve Young as “The Beautiful Warriors” and “magicians of the soul”– the performance was recorded and subsequently released on Impulse Records as The New Wave in Jazz.

This recording is significant for its brilliant “free jazz” performances, but also for Amiri Baraka’s (known as LeRoi Jones at the time) liner notes’ connection of music and politics. It is a reminder of the historic, turbulent times in which this music was created. The Selma to Montgomery marches took place in March, 1965. Malcolm X was assassinated in February. The war in Vietnam was dramatically escalating. And, jazz music was continuing to evolve, the most obvious example being the

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