• Read our interview with the eminent Armstrong scholar

  • Musicians and journalists share their lists of favorite jazz albums recorded during the 1960′s with our readers

  • I read the liner notes, listening to Evans in a way I had not listened to anything in some time,

  • This humorous edition features a “disturbing” and fascinating trend in 1950′s album art — Records on the Floor!

     

     

  • Interview with Louis Armstrong biographer Thomas Brothers
  • What are 3 or 4 of your favorite jazz albums from the 1960's?
  • "Broad Street" -- a short story by Arya Jenkins
  • Cover Stories with Paul Morris, Vol. 8
copenhagen Uncategorized

Dexter in Copenhagen

I will be traveling for the next couple of week so postings (if any) will be sparse. Wishing everyone the best for remainder of the summer!

Hope you enjoy this documentary footage of Dexter Gordon in Montmarte, Copenhagen, 1971. Click on “continue reading” to view it.

JJM […] Continue reading »

pharoah Features » Book Excerpts

A Journey Into Jazz: Anecdotes, Notes and Photos of a Jazz Fan

Lee Santa, who calls himself “simply a fan of jazz who is also a photographer” and whose life has been “heavily influenced by jazz’s sounds, structures and impressions,” recently reached out to me via email, informing me that Roundbend Press has just released his collection of photographs, A Journey Into Jazz: Anecdotes, Notes and Photos of a Jazz Fan.

Along with his entertaining introduction to the book, Santa sent me several photographs from the book — all of which I have never seen before. For example, there is Ornette Coleman at Berkeley’s Greek Theater in the turbulent year of 1968, Pharoah Sanders at the Village Gate in 1970, Sam Rivers playing outdoors (maybe at the Jazz Festival?) in Portland, 1979, and one of Mose Allison in Seattle in 1988 (about the same time I recall seeing him at a club in Portland).

Santa’s background story is very cool, and is told in his introduction and in Terry Simons’ publisher’s note, both published here. At the end of Santa’s introduction, you will find several photos […] Continue reading »

julian Interviews » Biographers

Interview with Cary Ginell — author of Walk Tall: The Music and Life of Julian “Cannonball” Adderley

Julian “Cannonball” Adderley’s stellar career began in the era of hard bop and ended (far too soon) during the time of jazz fusion. In between, he played on some of the most prominent recordings in the history of jazz — Miles Davis’ Kind of Blue and his own Somethin’ Else among them — and ultimately became what the critic Gary Giddins described as “the patron saint of the soul-hymn movement,” a music that would reach a broad affluent audience while also keeping jazz relevant in the African-American neighborhoods. […] Continue reading »

rolandkirk1 Uncategorized

Homage and Memories of Rahsaan Roland Kirk

Rahsaan Roland Kirk defined “musical brilliance.” Referring to jazz as “black classical music,” his genius, showmanship and originality for it was welcomed by some, but, as jazz entrepreneur Todd Barkin wrote, “Rahsaan created a universe of his own, musically, spiritually, and aesthetically — and that was too heavy for most people.” Some critics and musicians even derided his work as that of a “circus act.”

Fortunately, nearly 37 years since his death, a group of wonderfully eccentric New Yorkers — led by Kirk biographer John Kruth (Bright Moments: The Life and Legacy of Rahsaan Roland Kirk) — is assembling […] Continue reading »

natcole Quiz Show

Monday Jazz Quiz #50

Maurice Ravel acknowledged basing his Boléro on an improvisation of this clarinetist, who was also influential in the careers of Benny Goodman and Nat Cole, who made famous this musician’s theme song, “Sweet Lorraine.” Who is he?

Sidney Bechet

Johnny Doods

Jimmy Noone

Wilbur Sweatman

Frankie Teschemacher

Buster Bailey

Ted Lewis

[…] Continue reading »