• This month’s edition looks at album covers showing teenagers enjoying their music!

  • Musicians and journalists share their lists of favorite jazz albums recorded during the 1960′s with our readers

  • Disenchanted leaves fell early through the trees the summer I left my life for an ashram. The path to the ashram snaked into the woods not far from Tanglewood and reminded me less of where I had been than where I was going

  • A photo gallery of select Van Vechten portraits

     

     

  • Cover Stories with Paul Morris, Volume 6
  • What are 3 or 4 of your favorite jazz albums from the 1960's?
  • "Epistrophy," a short story by Arya Jenkins
  • The Photography of Carl Van Vechten
satchmoatthewaldorf Uncategorized

Jazz on Stage

In addition to this being a great time for jazz biography (essential studies recently published on Ellington, Armstrong, Bird, Mingus, and Bud Powell), as Nate Chinen points out in Sunday’s New York Times, it is also a terrific time for its presentation on the stages of New York, with Terry Teachout’s “Satchmo at the Waldorf” now playing at the Westside Theater, and Lanie Robertson’s “Lady Day at Emerson’s Bar & Grill” at Circle in the Square (revived after a successful Off Broadway run in 1986). […] Continue reading »

hampton Quiz Show

Monday Jazz Quiz #35

While a member of Lionel Hampton’s band, his “Flying Home” solo was considered to be the first R&B sax solo. Who was he?

Johnny Board

Eddie Chamblee

James Moody

Buddy Tate

Illinois Jacquet

Frank Foster

Willie Smith

Dexter Gordon

[…] Continue reading »

bessieeaster Features

Great Encounters #35: The 1925 Bessie Smith/Louis Armstrong recording sessions

“Great Encounters” are book excerpts that chronicle famous encounters among twentieth-century cultural icons.  This edition tells the story of the 1925 recording session of Bessie Smith and Louis Armstrong

Excerpted from Bessie, by Chris Albertson

__________

I’ve got the world in a jug;
The stopper’s in my hand.
“Down Hearted Blues”

When Bessie sang those words on her first recording date in 1923, her future looked promising, but by the onset of 1925, there was no longer any doubt — Bessie had “arrived.” She could look back on a year and a half of prominence and prosperity; her billing as “The Greatest and Highest Salaried Race Star in the World” was accurate; dreams of supporting her family had come true; […] Continue reading »

bing Literature

“Vintage Gray” – a poem by Joshua Michael Stewart

The morning glory –
another thing
that will never be my friend.
— Basho

Rain has a way of darkening the bark on trees,
deepening the wood cracks in fences.
Grass appears softer, envious of clouds
that tease with their rootlessness,
their promise of travel and a good night’s sleep.
Normally, I’d have a little Johnny Hodges
playing in the background or Casablanca
splashing silvery-blue against a wall,
[…] Continue reading »

epistrophy1 Literature » Jazz Fiction by Arya Jenkins

“Epistrophy” – a short story by Arya Jenkins

The publication of Arya Jenkins’ “Epistrophy” is the third in a series of short stories she has been commissioned to write for Jerry Jazz Musician. For information about her column, please see our September 12 “Letter From the Publisher.” For Ms. Jenkins’ introduction to her work, read “Coming to Jazz.”

__________

Disenchanted leaves fell early through the trees the summer I left my life for an ashram. The path to the ashram snaked into the woods not far from Tanglewood and reminded me less of where I had been than where I was going with its rotund emphasis on kindness and formality-Within a year I would be studying Buddhism in a monastery and teaching English at Cornell in Ithaca.

I was attempting to put a punto finale to the moneyed nonsense in which I’d lived too long in Fairfield County, and wanted to quell my fulminating instinct, my destructive fires and find some kind of peace and stability, even at the expense of boredom–which may have been expecting too much.
[…] Continue reading »