• Bowker’s poem honors Bill Evans

  • “You Blows What You Is” is the winning entry in our 41st Short Fiction Contest

     

  • An excerpt from What the Eye Hears: A History of Tap Dancing, in which author Brian Seibert recounts a time when the connection between jazz and tap began to grow strained — through no fault of the great hoofer Baby Laurence, who adapted tap to bebop.  

  • “Liner Notes for ‘Stardust’ — In Seven Choruses” is a cycle of short poems framed as imaginary liner notes and prompted by poet Doug Fowler’s favorite musical covers of Hoagy Carmichael’s “Stardust.”

  • "In Search of an Elegy" -- a poem by Larsen Bowker
  • "You Blows What You Is" -- a story by Ruth Knafo Setton
  • Book Excerpt from What the Eye Hears
  • "Liner Notes for 'Stardust'" -- short poems by Doug Fowler
brain1 Uncategorized

Mind of Blue: Conveying Emotion Affects Brain’s Creativity Network

In a recent University of California, San Francisco study involving jazz pianists, according to the public release document associated with the research, neuroscientists have concluded that “the workings of neural circuits associated with creativity are significantly altered when artists are actively attempting to express emotions.”

The public release, entitled “Mind of Blue: Conveying Emotion Affects Brain’s Creativity Network,” reminds us that during the act of improvisation, a brain region known as the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), which is “involved in planning and monitoring behavior” is deactivated, allowing the musician to enter into a “flow state” that artists enter to

[…] Continue reading »

prez Quiz Show » Jazz History Quiz

Jazz History Quiz #80

Throughout his career, this saxophonist was known as the “Vice Prez” because he sounded so similar to Lester Young. Who was he?

Earl Bostic

Paul Quinichette

Ben Webster

Coleman Hawkins

Johnny Hodges

Arnett Cobb

Herschel Evans

Go to the next page for the answer!

[…] Continue reading »

chetjan9 Literature » Poetry

“Chet Baker and his Abandoned Shadows” — an essay and poem by Arya F. Jenkins

We like to immortalize talent in this culture, and in so doing, often decontextualize it, absolving it of complexity and stains. Media especially likes to make angels out of demons, and vice versa, stripping the truth out of images and ideas.

In the case of Chet Baker, William Claxton’s photographs helped especially to immortalize the singer and trumpeter, fixing him in time and space, freezing an idea of him as beautiful, ethereal, ideal.

Chet Baker is almost always remembered as the

[…] Continue reading »