• Bowker’s poem honors Bill Evans

  • “You Blows What You Is” is the winning entry in our 41st Short Fiction Contest

     

  • An excerpt from What the Eye Hears: A History of Tap Dancing, in which author Brian Seibert recounts a time when the connection between jazz and tap began to grow strained — through no fault of the great hoofer Baby Laurence, who adapted tap to bebop.  

  • “Liner Notes for ‘Stardust’ — In Seven Choruses” is a cycle of short poems framed as imaginary liner notes and prompted by poet Doug Fowler’s favorite musical covers of Hoagy Carmichael’s “Stardust.”

  • "In Search of an Elegy" -- a poem by Larsen Bowker
  • "You Blows What You Is" -- a story by Ruth Knafo Setton
  • Book Excerpt from What the Eye Hears
  • "Liner Notes for 'Stardust'" -- short poems by Doug Fowler
rita1 Literature » Poetry

Poet Myra Litton writes of Rita Hayworth and Sophia Loren

Put the Blame on Mame Rita Hayworth in Gilda (1946)

There was never quite a dame as hot as Rita in Put the Blame on Mame
Gilda with luscious red locks
And strapless slit dress
We can imagine her while dancing in a state of undress -but I digress
Hair wanton and free expressing sexuality
In ample quantity
Gilda/Rita undulating to jazzy accompaniment in sultry climes
A time capsule of those forties’ times

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scott1 Quiz Show » Jazz History Quiz

Jazz History Quiz #81

This saxophonist – best known for his Blue Note soul-jazz jams of the 1960s – replaced John Coltrane in Earl Bostic’s early R&B/jazz band, played in Max Roach’s band after his time in the military, and was married to the organist Shirley Scott. Who is he?

Jimmy Scott

Benny Golson

Tom Scott

Eddie “Lockjaw” Davis

Eddie Harris

James Moody

Lou Donaldson

Stanley Turrentine

Go to the next page for the answer!

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frank2 Features » A Moment in Time

A Moment in Time — Capitol Records’ Studio A, 1956

In 1956, shortly after recording Songs for Swingin’ Lovers — which included the ultimate Frank Sinatra tune, Cole Porter’s “I’ve Got You Under My Skin” — Sinatra’s career was white-hot. His record contract with Capitol was up for renegotiation, which posed a financial challenge for Capitol, who competed with other labels, particularly RCA, for Sinatra’s services. “When we took him on two and half years ago, Frank couldn’t get a record,” Capitol executive Alan Livingston told Downbeat. “Now, every company in the business is after him.”

After signing Sinatra to a seven-year contract that carried an annual guarantee of $200,000, Sinatra biographer James Kaplan writes that he had a “virtual carte blanche to record whatever he pleased. The suits were happy enough with their star to grant him an indulgence or two, and the first was

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type1 Uncategorized

Calling all writers to “blow as deep as you want to blow”

The deadline for our next Jerry Jazz Musician Short Fiction Contest – the 41st since the contest’s inception in 2002 – is January 31. Please click here for complete contest details. If you would like to read our most recent winning story, “The Blues Museum,” by Jay Franzel, click here.

Also…I encourage writers to submit short stories, poems, essays and opinions for publication consideration at any time. Think of Jerry Jazz Musician as a place for “jazz literature,” and a place where, as Jack Kerouac would say, a writer can “blow as deep as you want to blow.” We have a large audience of readers (including 24,000+ Facebook “likes”) who may enjoy seeing what you have to say. If you want to submit something,

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