• I deplaned in Amsterdam to confront my father. In 1990, the year I was born, after the likes of Stan Getz and Freddie Hubbard dubbed him “the reincarnation of Chet Baker,” he quit his part-time job repairing cars in Gilbert, Iowa to go on a worldwide tour from which he never returned.

  • The friendship of Coltrane and Dolphy and the time of “anti-jazz”

  • This edition features a selection of covers by Curt John Witt, the prolific illustrator for mid-century budget record labels

  • Mercies would have put blues on the menu if it could, but that was a province of the kitchen, where I worked four and a half months too many. I heard actual blues music and caught a gust of air conditioning whenever I

     

     

  • "Homage" -- a short story by Kenneth Levine
  • A Moment in Time -- John Coltrane and Eric Dolphy, 1961
  • Cover Stories with Paul Morris, Vol. 10
  • "HEAT," -- a short story by Arya Jenkins
mp32 Uncategorized

Our commitment to music in the digital age

In the October 17 edition of the New York Times Magazine, in an article titled “Streaming Music Has Left Me Adrift,” Dan Brooks articulates what many of us who grew up with the long playing record album have long mourned, the passing of the era when consumers “owned” their own music collection based on a dedication of pursuing musical interests.

With the current ability to listen to just about anything ever recorded with merely an insignificant monetary monthly subscription (Brooks calls it “sharing the same record collection”), gone are the days when […] Continue reading »

monk1 Literature » Poetry

“Thelonious Monk” — a poem by Stephen Dobyns

A record store on Wabash was where
I bought my first album. I was a freshman
in college and played the record in my room

over and over. I was caught by how he took
the musical phrase and seemed to find a new
way out, the next note was never the note

you thought would turn up and yet seemed
correct. Surprise in ‘Round Midnight
or Sweet and Lovely. I bought the album

for Mulligan but stayed for Monk. I was
[…] Continue reading »

clarkterry2 Uncategorized

Keep On Keepin’ On — a documentary on Clark Terry

In the introduction to his 2011 autobiography, trumpeter Clark Terry writes; “I’d always thought that the most important thing was to play my horn — to get into this band or that band or Duke’s band, to have my own band, to perform, record. And I did enjoy those things. Worked hard to achieve them. But, later on, I had a new dream: helping young musicians to make their dreams come true. That became my supreme joy and my greatest aspiration.” Indeed, while Terry’s musical career is legendary (Dizzy Gillespie thought he was “the best trumpeter around”), his life may be remembered as much for his work with young musicians as his impact on the bandstand.

A new documentary, Keep On Keepin’ On, is evidence of Terry’s passion for mentoring younger […] Continue reading »

yancey1 Quiz Show

Jazz History Quiz #55

Described by one reviewer as “one of the pioneers of this raucous, rapid-fire, eight-to-the-bar piano style,” this pianist was active in Chicago from 1915 but remained unrecorded until 1939. In addition to his work as a pianist, during World War I he played baseball for the Negro Baseball League’s Chicago All-Americans, and was a groundskeeper for the Chicago White Sox throughout his life. Who is he?

Pete Johnson

James P. Johnson

Albert Ammons

Meade Lux Lewis

Luckey Roberts

Cliff Jackson

Jimmy Yancey

Tony Jackson

[…] Continue reading »

stewart-coltrane2 Art » Masters of Jazz Photography

Masters of Jazz Photography — Chuck Stewart

In honor of the late jazz photographer Lee Tanner, Jerry Jazz Musician presents a number of editions of “Master of Jazz Photography,” featuring a work by one of the photographers featured in Tanner’s book The Jazz Image.



This edition: Chuck Stewart […] Continue reading »