• Read our interview with the eminent Armstrong scholar

  • Musicians and journalists share their lists of favorite jazz albums recorded during the 1960′s with our readers

  • This edition features Alex Steinweiss record album covers from his prime period — the late 1940′s and early 1950′s. 

  • Royal had studied her from the bandstand each and every night since their first gig. Such a little thing she was.

     

     

  • Interview with Louis Armstrong biographer Thomas Brothers
  • What are 3 or 4 of your favorite jazz albums from the 1960's?
  • "Cover Stories with Paul Morris, Vol. 7"
  • New Short Fiction Award -- "Fever" by Yvonne McBride
hughes1 Literature

Langston Hughes reads “The Weary Blues”

“The Weary Blues” — a poem about the importance of music and the blues in everyday life — is a signature work of Langston Hughes, the Harlem Renaissance writer whose poetry helped change the way art created by African Americans was viewed, and influenced the writers of the beat generation. Written in 1925, the melancholy poem is set in a Harlem bar where a piano player plays the blues, and is one of the first poems to mix poetry and music.

Besides being a great writer, Hughes was an eloquent communicator, and it is a wonderful experience to hear him read his own poetry.. This 1958 film shows him reading “The Weary Blues” to the accompaniment of a Canadian group led by pianist Doug Parker. […] Continue reading »

barnet1 Quiz Show

Monday Jazz Quiz #40

This bassist played with Charlie Barnet (pictured) in 1942, was on the recording session of Coleman Hawkins’ “The Man I Love,” appeared in a mystery movie called The Crimson Canary, “inadvertently” discovered Cannonball Adderley, and is considered the pioneer of the cello as a solo instrument in jazz. Who is he?

Milt Hinton

Jimmy Blanton

Oscar Pettiford

Charles Mingus

Charlie Haden

Red Callendar

Curly Russell

Walter Page […] Continue reading »

tbone1 Uncategorized

T-Bone Walker plays with Jazz at the Philharmonic

Trolling through YouTube this morning I came across a fabulous performance from November, 1966 featuring T-Bone Walker playing “Woman You Must Be Crazy” and “Goin’ to Chicago” with one of the greatest of all the Jazz at the Philharmonic ensembles.

Filmed in London, promoter Norman Granz introduces the performance by explaining how a blues singer like Walker fits into his jazz concert:
[…] Continue reading »