• A look at Rahsaan Roland Kirk’s to “rescue black classical music from certain oblivion and thrust it into the consciousness of the unwitting public.” 

  • In 1961 Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer had purchased Verve Records from Norman Granz. Creed Taylor became the new executive director, and made a number of crucial policy decisions, including the sacking of the majority of Verve’s contract artists. One of a handful to survive was

  •  This edition features the “late Columbia” era of master designer Alex Steinweiss

  • Klein’s pupil in the studio seemed to be trying to erase his presence through sheer aggression. Had Mozart started that way? Till didn’t think so.

  • The Jazz and People's Movement
  • Great Encounters: In the studio with Bill Evans and Stan Getz
  • Cover Stories with Paul Morris, Vol. 12
  • "Till's Piano Lesson" -- Short Fiction Contest-winning story
goodman Art

Coming Soon: Cover Stories with Paul Morris

           Fans of album cover art are in for a unique and entertaining experience — “Cover Story with Paul Morris” will debut on Jerry Jazz Musician on Tuesday, October 8. Morris is an avid Portland, Oregon collector who, in his words, will “share his enthusiasm for the artists who created album covers in the ‘40s and ‘50s.” […] Continue reading »

monkoct2 Features

Great Encounters #28: When The Baroness Pannonica de Koenigswarter met Thelonious Monk

Paris was the perfect place for Monk and Nica’s first meeting. The city had lost some of its pre-war sheen but was still the capital of chic. Chanel had reopened her fashion house in 1954, introducing natty little suit jackets and slimline skirts. French movies inspired women to cut off their hair, wear cigarette pants and hooped earrings. There was an aura of tolerant multiculturalism. Nica’s friend Kenny Clarke, the bebop drummer, arrived in 1947: […] Continue reading »

albertmurray Interviews

On the Influence of Albert Murray

One of my more interesting experiences as publisher of Jerry Jazz Musician was producing a series of interviews that focused on the work of the novelist Ralph Ellison. Invisible Man was a favorite novel of mine as a young man, but it wasn’t until I reread it in the 1990’s before I began to understand the enormity of its cultural significance. At that time, Ellison’s second (and unfinished) novel Juneteenth was being published, and a variety of books on Ellison were released at the same time – among them Living with Music, a collection of Ellison’s writings on jazz music edited by Columbia University scholar Robert O’Meally, and Trading Twelves: The Selected Letters of Ralph Ellison and Albert Murray. […] Continue reading »