• Bowker’s poem honors Bill Evans

  • “You Blows What You Is” is the winning entry in our 41st Short Fiction Contest

     

  • An excerpt from What the Eye Hears: A History of Tap Dancing, in which author Brian Seibert recounts a time when the connection between jazz and tap began to grow strained — through no fault of the great hoofer Baby Laurence, who adapted tap to bebop.  

  • “Liner Notes for ‘Stardust’ — In Seven Choruses” is a cycle of short poems framed as imaginary liner notes and prompted by poet Doug Fowler’s favorite musical covers of Hoagy Carmichael’s “Stardust.”

  • "In Search of an Elegy" -- a poem by Larsen Bowker
  • "You Blows What You Is" -- a story by Ruth Knafo Setton
  • Book Excerpt from What the Eye Hears
  • "Liner Notes for 'Stardust'" -- short poems by Doug Fowler
monkmarshall Art

Masters of Jazz Photography — Jim Marshall

The great improvisational American jazz musicians of the mid-20th century inspired a generation of photographers to develop a looser, moodier style of visual expression. That evocative approach is on striking display in The Jazz Image: Masters of Jazz Photography. Covering six decades of performers — from Louis Armstrong and Duke Ellington to John Coltrane and Miles Davis — this unique collection is as much a comprehensive catalogue of jazz greats as it is a salute to the photographers who captured them.

Jerry Jazz Musician presents a number of editions of “Master of Jazz Photography,” featuring a work by one of the photographers featured in The Jazz Image

This edition: Jim Marshall

[…] Continue reading »

etude1 Features

Revisiting “The Jazz Problem”

In 1924, jazz was becoming popular in the major cities of New Orleans, Chicago, Kansas City and New York, and with Paul Whiteman’s Aeolian Hall performance of George Gershwin’s Rhapsody in Blue, it was being judged in some critical circles as a serious musical art form. That wasn’t the opinion of everyone, of course.

“‘Jazz’ has created a ‘malarious’ atmosphere in the musical world. It is abnormal. The air needs clarifying.” So wrote popular music composer Robert M. Stults in the August 1924 edition of The Etude magazine, an issue dedicated to what they defined as “The Jazz Problem.”

The Etude was published from 1883 – 1957 and was a popular music publication of the era. Its primary audience was made up of popular music teachers, and the debate of the time of this particular edition was the legitimacy of this controversial new music known as “Jazz.” To solicit opinion about jazz, The Etude posed the question “Where is Jazz Leading America?” to composers, educators, musicians, members of the clergy, playwrights and novelists.

The debate inspired by this question featured fascinating perspectives, […] Continue reading »

getz1 Quiz Show

Monday Jazz Quiz #27

After playing a 1950 concert with a pick-up rhythm section, Stan Getz hired the trio. The trio included Walter Bolden on drums and Joe Calloway on bass. Who was the trio’s pianist?

Cecil Taylor

Barry Harris

Wynton Kelly

Phineas Newborn

Tommy Flanagan

Hank Jones

George Shearing

Horace Silver […] Continue reading »