• Paul shares some of his personal jazz record collection, concentrating on the lesser known and sometimes quirky covers

  • This edition tells the story of Billy Taylor’s 1937 visit to Jelly Roll Morton’s Washington, D.C. club, where he witnessed Morton’s “arrogant wisdom”

  • In November, 1946, at the height of his popularity, Dizzy Gillespie took his big band out on the road, and in 1947 hired Ella Fitzgerald to tour the South.

  • “Songs for Sometime Losers: A Bebop Suite”  is a series of short acrostic riffs  — not unlike a long blistering saxophone or wistful piano solo within a larger piece — that together make up one jazzy whole

  • Cover Stories with Paul Morris, Vol. 14
  • Great Encounters: When Billy Taylor saw Jelly Roll Morton
  • A Moment in Time — Ella Fitzgerald and Dizzy Gillespie, 1947
  • “Songs for Sometime Losers: A Bebop Suite” — by Beth Spencer
mlk522 Quiz Show » Jazz History Quiz

Jazz History Quiz #72

Following Martin Luther King Jr.’s 1968 assassination, this famous singer was offered unofficial leadership in the civil rights movement by King’s widow, Coretta Scott King. Who is she?

Ethel Waters

Aretha Franklin

Josephine Baker

Ivie Anderson

Dinah Washington

Carmen McRae

Alberta Hunter

Go to the next page for the answer!
[…] Continue reading »

lundvall1 Features » In Memoriam

Bruce Lundvall, 1935 – 2015

Bruce Lundvall, a record executive best known among fans of jazz music as Blue Note Records president for 25 years, died yesterday at the age of 79. In addition to his work at Blue Note, Lundvall was president of CBS Records during the heyday of the LP business, and was responsible for signing many of that label’s major artists, and for expanding the jazz division of Columbia Records.

My own experience with him was always very favorable. Although I hadn’t spoken to him for several years, whenever I did reach out to him, either as a record executive myself or as publisher of Jerry Jazz Musician, he always made himself available and was supportive of my work.

In 2003, I hosted a conversation on the state of the business of jazz with Lundvall, New York Times columnist Ben Ratliff, and saxophonist Joshua Redman. Part of the discussion dealt with […] Continue reading »

miller Literature » Short Fiction

“Mystery in C Minor” — a short story by Bruce Golden

The winner of the November, 2006 Short Fiction Contest, Bruce Golden’s story looks at the mystery surrounding the death of Major Glenn Miller.

_____

January 30, 1946 — Allied Headquarters, Paris, France


“What is it, Captain? I’m very busy.”

“Sorry to disturb you, Colonel, but you said you wanted a report as soon as I completed my investigation.”

Colonel Washburn searched his desk muttering, “Yes, yes. I’ll read your report as soon as you’ve filed it.”

Captain Mercer didn’t move. He was hesitant to annoy his superior officer when the man was so obviously distracted by other concerns, but he was convinced it was necessary.

“Pardon me, sir, but I know the directive for this investigation came from the top, and I believe you should hear my findings before any official documents are filed.”

The colonel looked up at his subordinate for the first time. “What do you mean? What did your investigation reveal?”

“Well, sir . . . .” Captain Mercer hesitated. He’d rehearsed this, but now wasn’t certain where to begin.

“Come on, son, I don’t have all day. Major Miller’s plane went down somewhere over the Channel — correct?”

“Well yes . . . and no.” Mercer cringed at how it sounded.

“What do you mean yes and no? It can’t be both, Captain. What exactly did your investigation conclude?”

[…] Continue reading »

bbking3 Features » In Memoriam

My B.B. King story — An unforgettable experience with my son, but the end of a business dream

The passing of an artist the magnitude of B.B. King hits us all in some way. Mostly it is a loss of a revered and cherished entertainer. Who doesn’t have a memory associated with the guitar riff from “The Thrill is Gone,” or his humor-laced vocal on “Nobody Loves Me But My Mother” (“and she could be jivin’ too!”)? But since he performed live at least 200 times a year for two generations, many of us also have memories from seeing him in concert or having met him that makes his death feel slightly more personal.

No one can doubt what a great musician he was, and in the summer of 1995, my then-six-year-old son Peter and I had an unforgettable personal experience with him that also demonstrated […] Continue reading »