• Paul Whiteman and New York Times critic Olin Downes write about Whiteman’s February 12, 1924 concert at New York’s Aeolian Hall billed as “An Experiment in Modern Music” 

  • “Playing for Tips” is the winning entry in our 42nd Short Fiction Contest

     

  • In this edition, Paul features choice selections from Decca Records

  • “Intergalactic Language,” a short story by James E. Guin, was a finalist in our recently concluded 42nd Short Fiction Contest.

  • Revisiting "An Experiment in Modern Music"
  • "Playing for Tips" -- a short story by Kevin Bennett
  • Cover Stories with Paul Morris, Vol. 19
  • "Intergalactic Language" - a short story by James Guin
parks1 Uncategorized

Invisible Man: Gordon Parks and Ralph Ellison in Harlem

Today’s New York Times informs us of an exhibition called “Invisible Man: Gordon Parks and Ralph Ellison in Harlem,” a 1948 collaboration among two of the era’s most prominent African-American artists. The show features newly discovered images and photographs that have never been exhibited.

According the Times piece, “the black-and-white photographs are vignettes of life in Harlem: street scenes of adults and children; political advocacy in real time; and imagined scenes from ‘Invisible Man,’ Ellison’s watershed 1952 novel. The photographs are

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duke1 Quiz Show » Jazz History Quiz

Jazz History Quiz #87

This lifelong friend of Duke Ellington co-wrote “Sophisticated Lady,” played clarinet, violin, baritone and alto saxophone during his first stint in Ellington’s band (prior to leaving in 1928), and, following time in a band that also included Fats Waller and Chu Berry, returned to Duke’s orchestra, where he would play alto until 1946. Who was he?

Don Redman

Johnny Hodges

Otto Hardwicke

Marshall Royal

Hilton Jefferson

Russell Procope

Go to the next page for the answer!

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monk1 Features » Great Encounters

Great Encounters #45: Miles and Monk at Newport, 1955

“Great Encounters” are book excerpts that chronicle famous encounters among twentieth-century cultural icons. This edition offers two accounts of the events surrounding Miles Davis and Thelonious Monk’s performance at the 1955 Newport Jazz Festival — a story that is, according to Thelonious Monk biographer Robin D.G. Kelley, “shrouded in myth.”

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giddins1 Interviews » Conversations with Gary Giddins

Gary Giddins on jazz criticism

Jazz history is filled with great moments and musicians, reported on over the years by critics whose work influenced the music’s path. Rudi Blesh, Martin Williams, Albert Murray, Dan Morgenstern, Nat Hentoff, Gene Lees, Leonard Feather, Whitney Balliett, and Stanley Crouch are just a handful of the critics whose liner notes, columns, opinions and histories we read while deepening our desires to grow with the music. The writer whose work is perhaps most renown is Gary Giddins, the award-winning writer who for years wrote about jazz for the Village Voice, and who I was privileged to interview several times about a variety of interesting topics in our Conversations with Gary Giddins series.

In June, 2003, Giddins and I talked about his ascension as a jazz writer, and included his candid observations of other prominent critics. The discussion concluded with a unique “Blindfold Test” that asked Giddins to name the jazz writer responsible for the essay excerpt he is spontaneously shown. It is a timeless view of

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