• Reflections on meeting B.B. King

  • This edition tells the story of the importance Miles Davis placed on his friendship with boxer Sugar Ray Robinson in 1954, when he was trying to kick his drug addiction.

  •  A look at Rahsaan Roland Kirk’s mission to “rescue black classical music from certain oblivion and thrust it into the consciousness of the unwitting public.”

  • This edition focuses on Everest Records, the last of several new labels that Alex Steinweiss helped launch

  • My B. B. King Story
  • Great Encounters: Miles Davis and Sugar Ray Robinson
  • The Jazz and People's Movement
  • Cover Stories with Paul Morris
booker1 Interviews » Conversations with Gary Giddins

Booker Ervin and other “underrated” saxophonists

I got caught up into listening to Booker Ervin this morning, and was reminded about my first experience listening to him as a leader — on a big band session he led called Booker ‘n’ Brass, a 1967 Pacific Jazz recording that has found its way to my turntable for the first time in probably 25 years. Forty-eight years since its recording, Ervin’s crisp attack over the top of the stalwart Teddy Edwards-led band on songs like “St. Louis Blues,” “Baltimore Oriole,” and “Harlem Nocturne” sounds as good as it did when I first discovered this record in a Portland used record shop for $2.99 , c. 1980.

Getting into Ervin again reminds me of a conversation I hosted in January, 2004, with the most eminent jazz critic of his era, Gary Giddins, who shared his thoughts with me in a three part series regarding the jazz musicians he deemed as being “underrated.” Here is the part where he talks about […] Continue reading »

jordan2 Quiz Show » Jazz History Quiz

Jazz History Quiz #71

While he had a long career in jazz, including stints with, among others, Coleman Hawkins, Roy Eldridge, Sonny Stitt and Stan Getz, he will always be remembered primarily as the pianist in Charlie Parker’s classic 1947 quintet. Who is he?

Duke Jordan

Lennie Tristano

Mel Powell

Bud Powell

Al Haig

George Wallington

Hampton Hawes

Go to the next page for the answer!
[…] Continue reading »

kirk2 Uncategorized

The Jazz and People’s Movement

In 1969, in the midst of rock music’s ascent and the social protests that effectively changed the way we looked at war, race and feminism, the great jazz musician Rahsaan Roland Kirk emerged as the leader of “The Jazz and People’s Movement,” a movement to, as John Kruth, author of Bright Moments: The Life and Legacy of Rahsaan Roland Kirk describes it, “rescue black classical music from certain oblivion and thrust it into the consciousness of the unwitting public.” Part of their plan was to “disrupt the prime time airwaves for the sake of the music they dearly loved and believe in,” and they were largely successful at it, disrupting the shows of Johnny Carson, Dick Cavett and Merv Griffin. Their tact was to […] Continue reading »

morgan2 Uncategorized

Search For the New Land

In an excellent October, 2014 post for The Wire, Derek Walmsley writes about how jazz musicians “from the mid-1950s onwards imagined liberation through distant places and spaces.”

“Before free jazz broke through in the 1960s,” he writes, “you could read a desire for liberation unfolding in the titles jazz musicians gave their compositions from the mid-1950s onwards. In previous years, players might have dedicated a piece to a woman or a passed colleague. Now, they were naming them after newly independent nations of Africa, to underline their Afrocentric solidarity; after locations in the Far East, to flaunt a growing interest in […] Continue reading »

lateef3 Art » Masters of Jazz Photography

Masters of Jazz Photography — Val Wilmer

In honor of the late jazz photographer Lee Tanner, Jerry Jazz Musician presents a number of editions of “Master of Jazz Photography,” featuring a work by one of the photographers featured in Tanner’s book The Jazz Image.



This edition: Val Wilmer […] Continue reading »