• In this edition, Paul writes about album covers picturing designer furniture

  • “Playing for Tips” is the winning entry in our 42nd Short Fiction Contest

     

  • A powerful poem on race

  • “Intergalactic Language,” a short story by James E. Guin, was a finalist in our recently concluded 42nd Short Fiction Contest.

  • Cover Stories with Paul Morris, Vol. 18
  • "Playing for Tips" -- a short story by Kevin Bennett
  • "Color Blind (For Real)" - a poem by Quincy Hull and Marc Livanos
  • "Intergalactic Language" - a short story by James Guin
sax1 Quiz Show » Jazz History Quiz

Jazz History Quiz #88

Who was occasionally billed as “The World’s Fastest Saxophonist”?

Illinois Jacquet

Flip Phillips

Ike Quebec

Charlie Ventura

Charlie Parker

Arnett Cobb

Johnny Griffin

Go to the next page for the answer!

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armstrong1 Uncategorized

The “new, subdued Louis Armstrong”

During the 1950’s and 60’s, when Louis Armstrong was one of the most famous people in the world, his opinions were often reported on, and would at times ruffle feathers on both sides of a political argument.

I recently came across an April 27, 1960 newspaper article that was published at a time when Armstrong was caught between 1) advocating for his country (while on tour as the country’s “jazz ambassador”) and 2) for his fellow African-American countrymen in the midst of the struggle for civil rights.

Titled “Satchmo Silent on Racial Crisis,” (from an unknown source but catalogued in the Armstrong file at the Institute of Jazz Studies at Rutgers University) this excerpt – transcribed at the time by the reporter in a

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sam Features » Great Encounters

Great Encounters #22…Cassius Clay, Malcolm X, and Sam Cooke — the Clay/Sonny Liston fight, Miami, 1964

In honor of the passing of Muhammad Ali, I am re-posting “Great Encounters #22, Cassius Clay, Malcolm X, and Sam Cooke — the Clay/Sonny Liston fight, Miami, 1964,” in which Peter Guralnick, author of Dream Boogie: The Triumph of Sam Cooke, tells the story of Ali’s (then Cassius Clay) relationship with Cooke and the circumstances of Clay taking his new name.

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