• I deplaned in Amsterdam to confront my father. In 1990, the year I was born, after the likes of Stan Getz and Freddie Hubbard dubbed him “the reincarnation of Chet Baker,” he quit his part-time job repairing cars in Gilbert, Iowa to go on a worldwide tour from which he never returned.

  • The life of the legendary saxophonist is discussed

  • Noted critics and musicians list their essential 70’s jazz record albums

  • A story of 1974

     

     

  • "Homage" -- a short story by Kenneth Levine
  • Cannonball Adderley biographer is interviewed
  • "What are 3 or 4 of your favorite jazz albums from the 1970's?"
  • Joe Sample, the S.L.A., and a budding writer’s altered career path
evans1 Uncategorized

On Veteran’s Day — “Peace Piece” by Bill Evans

I submit this post with great thanks to all Veterans who have honorably served on our behalf…

For years I have thought the music that best honors those we celebrate on Veteran’s Day and Memorial Day is “Peace Piece” by Bill Evans. It’s a beautiful, simple and “peaceful” melody that is instantly memorable, and his playing is passionate and sensitive in a way Evans supremely communicates. Here is what Evans bassist Chuck Israels had to say about “Peace Piece”:

” “Peace Piece” is an example of the depth of Evans’ compositional technique. It is an ostinato piece, composed and recorded long before the more recent superficial synthesis of Indian and American music; in fact, it owes more to Satie and Debussy than to Ravi Shankar. The improvisation starts simply over a gentle […] Continue reading »

monroe Quiz Show » Jazz History Quiz

Jazz History Quiz #58

In 1956, this singer appeared in the film The Girl Can’t Help It, in which she wore a dress that had been worn by Marilyn Monroe in Gentlemen Prefer Blondes. She also appeared in several other films (including Spike Lee’s 1990 movie Mo’ Better Blues), and received a Golden Globe nomination for her role in the film For Love of Ivy. Who is she?

Helen Humes

Betty Carter

Abbey Lincoln

Sarah Vaughan

Shirley Horn

Ivie Anderson

Ethel Waters

[…] Continue reading »

chambers1 Features » Memorable Quotes

Memorable Quotes: Gil Evans on Paul Chambers

Paul Chambers, the bassist on many of Miles Davis’ most important recordings — including all that Gil Evans and Miles Davis collaborated on — fulfilled, according to Stephanie Stein Crease, author of Gil Evans: Out of the Cool, “an important role in Gil’s writing. The bass provided a harmonic color base as well as a rhythmic one, a foundation for the shifting polyrhythms among the brass and woodwinds.”

Here is what Evans said about Chambers:

There was nobody ever before or after Paul Chambers, he was such a glorious player. When he played up-tempo it was never the least bit choppy – he could hang onto the preceding note as long as possible before the next […] Continue reading »

assaf3 Features » On the Turntable

On the Turntable — Naked, by the Assaf Kehati Trio

I received a disc in the mail recently from Israeli-born guitarist Assaf Kehati called Naked, a nine song recording that includes bassist Ehud Ettun and drummer Ronen Itzik. It has grown on me to the point of not being able to remove it from my CD player (other than to carry it to my car so I can hear it while driving).

This is the New York-based guitarist’s third album, but it is my introduction to his work. The disc is anchored by the title track, which […] Continue reading »

homage Literature » Short Fiction

Short Fiction Contest-winning story #37: “Homage,” by Kenneth Levine

New Short Fiction Award

Three times a year, we award a writer who submits, in our opinion, the best original, previously unpublished work.


Kenneth Levine of Wethersfield, Connecticut is the winner of the thirty-seventh Jerry Jazz Musician New Short Fiction Award, announced and published for the first time on November 5, 2014.


Homage

by

Kenneth Levine


_______________________________

I deplaned in Amsterdam to confront my father. In 1990, the year I was born, after the likes of Stan Getz and Freddie Hubbard dubbed him “the reincarnation of Chet Baker,” he quit his part-time job repairing cars in Gilbert, Iowa to go on a worldwide tour from which he never returned.

From the airport I boarded a train to Centraal Station, across from which the Prins Hendrik hotel is situated at the Northern end of Zeedijk Straat, and by early evening I had navigated through the designated lanes over which walkers, bicyclists, and motorists coursed to stand before a bronze tablet on the hotel’s brick front that featured a haggard Chet Baker playing the trumpet over an inscription that read: “Trumpet player and singer Chet Baker died here on May 13th, 1988. He will live on in his music for anyone […] Continue reading »