• In his 1993 book Upside Your Head! Rhythm and Blues on Central Avenue, the jazz and blues musician and impresario Johnny Otis writes primarily about the music scene in Los Angeles during the 40’s and 50’s.

  • Crosley Radio’s colorful LP and 45 RPM players are now making their way into the mass market in a pretty substantial way.

  • On the evenings of April 21 and 22, 1961, Miles Davis and his quintet recorded at San Francisco’s The Black Hawk nightclub, a longtime Tenderloin neighborhood establishment described by Bay area music writer Ralph J. Gleason as

  • A story about “a man of the cloth…deputized by a higher power to save jazzmen’s souls from the lures and wiles and temptations of bad taste.”

  • Johnny Otis writes about racism
  • An island of hope and sanity at the Consumer Electronics Show
  • Liner Notes -- Miles Davis in Person At The Blackhawk
  • "Father Kniest, Jazz Priest" -- a short story by Con Chapman
louis1 Quiz Show » Jazz History Quiz

Jazz History Quiz #64

Described as a “Louis Armstrong sound-alike on both trumpet and vocals” whose recording of “On the Sunny Side of the Street” was so close to Armstrong’s live show that some listeners thought Armstrong was copying him, this trumpeter (along with Bobby Stark), was Chick Webb’s main trumpet soloist during the 1930’s. Who is he?

Red Allen

Shorty Baker

Bill Berry

Rex Stewart

Cat Anderson

Taft Jordan

Erskine Hawkins

Go to the next page for the answer!

[…] Continue reading »

king Uncategorized

“This is triumphant music” — Martin Luther King writes about jazz

The only known public words ever written (or spoken) by Martin Luther King about jazz are those found in this essay, written for the 1964 Berlin Jazz Festival program.

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God has wrought many things out of oppression. He has endowed his creatures with the capacity to create—and from this capacity has flowed the sweet songs of sorrow and joy that have allowed man to cope with his environment and many different situations.

Jazz speaks for life. The Blues tell the story of life’s difficulties, and if you think for a moment, you will realize that they take the hardest realities of life and put them into music, only to come out with […] Continue reading »

dinah1 Uncategorized

“Jazz in the Schools” — a photography project for the Portland Jazz Festival

I have long felt that students who learn something about jazz music will not only appreciate it as an important American art form, but, once exposed to it will also discover artistic inspiration from it. Fortunately, there are members of the Portland education community who share this view, so on Monday of this week I was privileged to teach a “Short History of Jazz” class to three photography/graphic design classrooms at Portland’s Lincoln High School. This is part of a project — “Jazz in the Schools” — we developed at PDX Jazz, the presenting organization of the Portland Jazz Festival.

After seeing classic film of Louis Armstrong and viewing a variety of […] Continue reading »