• LeRoi Jones’ (Amiri Baraka) poetic, politically exuberant album liner notes to the 1965 album, New Wave in Jazz

  • On the recording Frank Sinatra Conducts Tone Poems of Color

  • She stood in a room at The Met glancing at the painting on the wall, which was of two women kissing. From her vantage point, standing slightly away and to the side, the two women lying together interlocked in bed appeared cushioned awkwardly in space, free-floating yet connected.

  • In this edition, Paul looks at the art of London Records

  • Liner Notes: The New Wave in Jazz, by LeRoi Jones
  • A Moment in Time — Capitol Records’ Studio A, 1956
  • "The Blue Kiss" -- a short story by Arya Jenkins
  • Cover Stories with Paul Morris, Vol. 15
newwave1 Features » Liner Notes

Liner Notes: The New Wave in Jazz, by LeRoi Jones and Steve Young

On March 28, 1965, a concert benefiting the Black Arts Repertory Theatre/School was held at New York’s Village Gate. Featuring John Coltrane, Archie Shepp, Sun Ra (he played but his music didn’t make the album) and Albert Ayler – artists described by Black Arts Music Coordinator Steve Young as “The Beautiful Warriors” and “magicians of the soul”– the performance was recorded and subsequently released on Impulse Records as The New Wave in Jazz.

This recording is significant for its brilliant “free jazz” performances, but also for Amiri Baraka’s (known as LeRoi Jones at the time) liner notes’ connection of music and politics. It is a reminder of the historic, turbulent times in which this music was created. The Selma to Montgomery marches took place in March, 1965. Malcolm X was assassinated in February. The war in Vietnam was dramatically escalating. And, jazz music was continuing to evolve, the most obvious example being the

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burrell1 Interviews » Conversations with Gary Giddins

Jazz writer Gary Giddins on underrated jazz guitarists

“If you look at the Grove Dictionary of Jazz, it is three volumes of jazz history and it embodies a never-ending challenge to discover all those artists. I think the important thing is to look beyond the most celebrated names. In this regard, jazz is profoundly different from nineteenth century classical music, where the pantheon has proven remarkably stable. A jazz listener will want to hear Miles Davis — his reputation is there for a reason — but so much of the fun in jazz lies in finding those distinct personalities who were extremely individual and inventive, yet abide in relative obscurity.”

This comment was made by the most eminent jazz writer Gary Giddins during our “Conversations with Gary Giddins” series, in which he talked about underrated jazz musicians. This particular conversation — from 2004 — concerns underrated jazz guitarists.

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rita1 Literature » Poetry

Poet Myra Litton writes of Rita Hayworth and Sophia Loren

Put the Blame on Mame Rita Hayworth in Gilda (1946)

There was never quite a dame as hot as Rita in Put the Blame on Mame
Gilda with luscious red locks
And strapless slit dress
We can imagine her while dancing in a state of undress -but I digress
Hair wanton and free expressing sexuality
In ample quantity
Gilda/Rita undulating to jazzy accompaniment in sultry climes
A time capsule of those forties’ times

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scott1 Quiz Show » Jazz History Quiz

Jazz History Quiz #81

This saxophonist – best known for his Blue Note soul-jazz jams of the 1960s – replaced John Coltrane in Earl Bostic’s early R&B/jazz band, played in Max Roach’s band after his time in the military, and was married to the organist Shirley Scott. Who is he?

Jimmy Scott

Benny Golson

Tom Scott

Eddie “Lockjaw” Davis

Eddie Harris

James Moody

Lou Donaldson

Stanley Turrentine

Go to the next page for the answer!

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