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“What are 3 or 4 of your favorite jazz recordings from the 1960′s?”


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A Love Supreme is a common response among the participants answering the question:  “What are 3 or 4 of your favorite jazz recordings from the 1960′s?”

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     What do the musicians Don Byron, Jane Ira Bloom, Eric Revis, Robin Eubanks, Steve Turre, and Warren Wolf have in common with the journalists Gary Giddins, John Goodman, Terry Teachout, and Marc Myers?  They have all participated in the next edition of “Reminiscing in Tempo: Memories and Opinion” by answering the question, “What are 3 or 4 of your favorite jazz recordings from the 1960′s?”

     The complete edition will be published in April, and many more participants are expected.  Meanwhile, here is a sampling of responses:

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My favorite three jazz recordings from the 1960′s are (in order)

1) Four & More (Miles Davis)
2) Miles Smiles (Miles Davis)
3) Empyrean Isles (Herbie Hancock)

“Yes I’m a vibraphonist but I’m very much a drummer, as well. The connection between Tony Williams and Ron Carter is just amazing. They’re like a tag team competing for a championship. They way the two of them play just elevates everybody from Miles, George Coleman, Wayne Shorter and Freddie Hubbard.”

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(1) The Modern Jazz Quartet, European Concert (Atlantic, 1960)

(2) Paul Desmond and Gerry Mulligan, Two of a Mind (RCA, 1962)

(3) Bill Evans, Conversations with Myself (Verve, 1963)

(4) Miles Davis Quintet, Nefertiti (Columbia, 1967)

The turf, needless to say, is impossibly large, and I might pick four completely different albums if I were to answer this question later today, or next week. But I doubt if they’d all be different.




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Art Blakey and the Jazz Messengers – Free For All

McCoy Tyner – The Real McCoy

Wayne Shorter – Night Dreamer

John Coltrane – A Love Supreme

JJ Johnson – Proof Positive


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     “Reminiscing in Tempo: Memories and Opinion” is part of a continuing effort to provide Jerry Jazz Musician readers with unique forms of “edu-tainment.” As often as possible, we pose one question via e mail to a small number of prominent and diverse people. The question is designed to provoke a lively response that will potentially include the memories and/or opinion of those solicited.

     Since it is not possible to know who will answer the question, the diversity of the participants will often depend on factors beyond the control of the publisher.


Click here for a sample edition of “Reminiscing in Tempo: Memories and Opinion”