Art

Boxing’s Golden Age

Boxing’s Golden Age


A photo exhibit illustrating the essence of sports during the first third of the American century — featuring forty photos from the Harry E. Winkler Photographic Collection.



Lou Nova


________________________



About the Collection

 The Harry E. Winkler Photographic Collection includes more than 7,500 different boxing related images in various formats. Winkler was a longtime Los Angeles area fight figure and California correspondent for Ring magazine from 1939 to 1953. He is best remembered, however, for his extensive collection of boxing photographs, many of which were acquired by the University Libraries of Notre Dame in 1977.

 Highlights of the collection include close to 4,000 4 x 5 inch glass negatives, mostly taken in California in the 1920’s and 30’s. These are typically posed portraits, of individuals or groups — virtually no fight scenes are included. Among the boxers represented in the collection are Sgt. Sammy Baker, Newsboy Brown, Tony Canzoneri, Bert Colima, Jack Dempsey, Joe Dundee, Tommy O’Brien, Baby Sal Sorio, and Mickey Walker.

 The Winkler Collection also includes close to 1,000 4 x 5 inch and 8 x 10 inch film base portrait negatives. Most of these date from the 1940’s and 50’s, while some are second-generation negatives of late nineteenth and early twentieth century prints.

For the most part, the portraits in the Winkler Collection are of boxers who fought professionally in the United States c. 1920-1960, with a very decided emphasis on fighters with a California connection. Also in the collection are over 1,000 4 x 5 inch film base negatives (with contact prints) showing fight action — most of the bouts involved were held in the San Francisco Bay area in the late 1940’s. #

 A database to Winkler Collection portraits is currently in preparation.   For more information, visit the collection at the University Libraries of Notre Dame.



Many thanks to the University Libraries of Notre Dame for their cooperation in the publication of this exhibit.



________________________



Photograph captions include fighters name (and nickname), his hometown, the division he fought in, his career span, and his record.  No photo credits are available.

Boxer statistics and biographies provided by BoxRec.com




“[Native Son author] Richard Wright paid tribute to his hero, Joe Louis, with the lyrics of a blues song, ‘King Joe.’ Count Basie wrote the music, and Paul Robeson, for the first time in his life, sang the blues. Wright was proud of their collaboration. Recorded by John Hammond on the Okeh label, ‘King Joe’ was for sale in mid-November (1941), released on two sides of a ten-inch 78 RPM record. The New York Times critic thought it ‘mighty good’ jazz. The New Masses declared it ‘swell to dance to.’ By mid-January, forty thousand records had been sold.”

- Hazel Rowley, from Richard Wright, The Life and Times.

Listen to Count Basie’s orchestra play King Joe, with vocalist Paul Robeson






“Do you recognize me?” the old opponent asked. Willie looked hard and considered before finally replying “Lie down so I can recognize you.”

- Willie Pep, talking to an old opponent years after each retired





Pedro Amador (left) and Santiago Zorilla

Pedro Amador

Colon, Panama

_____

Lightweight, 1926 – 1929

Won 21 (4 ko’s) – Lost 14 – 6 draws

*

Santiago Zorilla

Culver City, California

_____

Featherweight, 1925 – 1933

Won 45 (6 ko’s) – Lost 32 – 8 draws

Lou Ambers

Herkimer, NY

*

“Herkimer Hurricane”

_____

Lightweight, 1932 – 1941

Won 94 (31 ko’s) – Lost 8 – 7 draws

Henry Armstrong

Columbus, Mississippi

*

“Homicide Hank”

_____

Welterweight, 1931 – 1945

Won 151 (100 ko’s) – Lost 21 – 10 draws

Max Baer

Livermore, California

*

“Livermore Larupper”

_____

Heavyweight, 1921 – 1941

Won 71 (53 ko’s) – Lost 13

Billy Barnes

Salt Lake City, Utah

_____

Welterweight, 1935 -1938

Won 9 (4 ko’s) – Lost 7 – 2 draws

Hank Bath

Fort Morgan, Colorado

_____

Heavyweight, 1935 – 1941

Won 6 (5 ko’s) – Lost 6

Panama Al Brown

*

“The Elongated Panamanian”

_____

1922 – 1942

Won139 (66 ko’s) – Lost 19 – 16 draws

Tony Canzoneri

New York, New York

_____

Featherweight, lightweight, 1925 – 1939

Won 137 (44 ko’s) – Lost 24 – 10 draws

Primo Carnera

Sequals, Italy

*

“The Ambling Alp”

_____

Heavyweight, 1928 – 1961

Won 87 (69 ko’s) – Lost 14 – 1 no decision

Jack Dempsey

Manassa, Colorado

_____

Heavyweight, 1914 – 1928

Won 64  (53 ko’s) – Lost 6 – 9 draws, 5 no decisions









 



Boxing’s Golden Age


A photo exhibit illustrating the essence of sports during the first third of the American century — featuring forty photos from the Harry E. Winkler Photographic Collection.


________________________________________________



“I ain’t never heard of him. I suppose he’s one of them foreign heavyweights. They’re all lousy. Sure as hell I’ll moider de bum.”

- Boxer Tony Galento, when asked about Shakespeare

 



Johnny Farr

Cleveland, Ohio

_____

Featherweight, 1922 – 1934

Won 42 (3 ko’s) – Lost 51 – 11 draws

Baby Joe Gans

Edmonton, Alberta

_____

Welterweight, 1922 – 1939

Won 108 (43 ko’s) – Lost 27 – 10 draws

Rocky Graziano

New York, New York

_____

Middleweight, 1942 – 1952

Won 67 (52 ko’s) – Lost 10 – 6 draws

Jack Holtz

Johnny Lamar

San Francisco, California

_____

Lightweight, 1922 – 1938

Won 90  (12 ko’s) – Lost 34 – 24 draws

Gus Lesnevich

Cliffside Park, New Jersey

_____

Light Heavyweight, 1934 – 1949

Won 60 (23 ko’s) – Lost 14 – 5 draws

Joe Louis

Detroit, Michigan

_____

Heavyweight, 1934 – 1951

Won 69 (55 ko’s) – Lost 3

Archie Moore (with announcer Speed Reilly)

Benoit, Mississippi

*

“Old Mongoose”

_____

Light Heavyweight, 1935 – 1963

Won 185  (131 ko’s) – Lost 24 -11 draws

Moon Mullins (with Whitey Eckvert)

Chicago, Illinois

_____

Featherweight, 1933 – 1938

Won 18 (2 ko’s) – Lost 9 – 4 draws

Lou Nova

Oakland, California

_____

Heavyweight, 1936 – 1945

Won 50 (30 ko’s) – Lost 9 – 4 draws